Evidence Based - Patient Centered - At Your Door

The Clinical Facts

Is there that big of a need?

 Dysphagia among individuals >50yrs ranges from 16-22%. 

    (Barer et al., 1989; Bloom et al., 1990; Gordon et al., 2010; Winchester & Winchester, 2015)

 Up to 60% of nursing home residents have feeding difficulties.

    (Barer et al., 1989; Bloom et al., 1990; Gordon et al., 2010; Winchester & Winchester, 2015)


Is it OK to wait?

Residents with dysphagia and aspiration have a 45% mortality rate after 1 year, with many episodes of complications if left untreated.

    (Croghan et al., 1994)

Consequences of having dysphagia can be severedehydration, malnutrition, choking, pneumonia and death.

   (Barer et al., 1989; Gordon et al., 2010)

Dysphagia accounts for between 13 and 48% of all infections in a SNF. 

(Langmore et al, 1998)


So what is the benefit?

Effectively managing dysphagia can reduce 1/3 of infections commonly found in residents, which in a 200 bed SNF could potentially prevent up to 66 Patients from unnecessary complications from infection.

   (Langmore et al, 1998)

Approximately 14% of older Patients experience dysphagia during oral medication administration.  In a 200 bed SNF, accurate identification of risk and proper management could prevent up to 28 Patients from experiencing dysphagia complications.

  (Gillicuddy et al., 2016)

COPD patients have a 30 day repeat hospitalization of 22.6% with 2/3 of those cases identified as being preventable.

(Martinez et al., 2013)